Banksy’s True Identity

Greetings,

I’m working with my art class on creating new stories for what happened to Frankenstein’s creature 200 years later. Students are drawing him this week with new possibilities. One student went as far as having the monster collecting hair from people because he is bald.

Here is the example I gave my students.

Banksy’s True Identity

By Mrs. Berry

It has been 200 years since we last saw Victor Frankenstein’s monster. Last we knew he headed out to the North and was never seen again. In recent years the monster’s art has been spotted across the globe. Unannounced to the world he is known as Banksy. Some claim that he was born in 1974 but he really was created in 1818 and was brought to life by the mad scientist Victor Frankenstein.

Banksy was distraught over never getting a bride and being isolated from other’s due to their cruelty. It has left him with a dark humor. He has given up murdering people but his criminal ways can be seen in his street art. His temper and distaste for society was evident in his last performance act. He mutilated his own creation while others watched in horror as it was shredded.

People do not seem to understand Banksy. Because of this he currently is hiding his true identity. If the people found out he was Victor’s creature they may come after him with pitch forks. He also has strong fear of fire. If you were ever to meet Banksy in the streets of London be wary of his good manners and emotional heart.  He is harboring a dark secret.

IMG_1619If you are interested in the full lesson click here. It is a six day unit geared for sixth grade students. There are two main activities in this unit. Students will create a story about what happened to Frankenstein’s monster 200 years later. Students will also create a picture using value to go along with the picture.

When you purchase this lesson you will receive an electronic file that includes Common Core objectives and Michigan visual art benchmarks addressed in the lesson, assessments, materials list, teacher examples of the story and picture, vocabulary list, resource list, and step-by-step instructions.

Artfully,

Mrs. Berry

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Strawberry

We just love strawberries and who doesn’t.  Even the deer and rabbits nibble away at our patch.  That is why we picked up two flats at our local Strawberry Fest.  We love making homemade strawberry jam and of course eating the strawberries.

Some of the steps involved in making jam include:IMG_3383

  1. Purchase or grow your own strawberries (7 quarts)
  2. Core or cut the tops off

 

 

 

IMG_33933. Channel your inner Hulk and smash them

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_33964. Add sugar, pectin, lemon

5.Boil and skim off the form

6. Using canning safety scoop jam into jars

 

 

 

 

IMG_33987. Boil jars

8. Cool

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_33979. Enjoy the jam!

 

 

 

Christy Berry

Strawberry by Christy Berry

We also made some art to go along with strawberry fest.  Last year my summer school program drew strawberries. You can find the lesson here.

 

 

 

 

19149275_1765904050093319_1857692042435905487_nThis year I painted my marker rock and put a finish on it.

 

 

 

 

Strawberry example

My seven year old daughter did her “S” page for her ABC book.  Our goal this summer is to finish her book. You can purchase the full lesson from my Teachers Pay Teachers page.  She had lots of fun drawing her strawberry and writing her own story.

 

 

 

Strawberry and the Giant by Gwendolyn

Once upon a time there was a giant that loved strawberries. And, one day the giant was going along to picked some strawberries. He picked up a strawberry and the strawberry said, “Please don’t eat me. I’m a little strawberry. And you need to look at a strawberry to see if there is white still on them. That means they are not ready to be picked or eaten.  Please look at every strawberry.” And the giant said, “Well, I don’t look at strawberries, I just eat them.” It will taste bad if they are not ready so maybe look at the strawberries you are going to pick first for bugs or teeth marks. Plus, never ever pick somebody else’s garden.” “Well, I do that all the time,” said the giant. “That mean,” said the strawberry.  Maybe you can make your own garden. And probably don’t eat from somebody else’s garden. Don’t do it.   “Ok, I will make my own garden it will take a couple of days for the strawberries to grow,” said the giant.  And that’s how they came friends. That’s a magic strawberry plant. And he made his own. The End.

Artfully,

Mrs. Berry

Meijer

Meijer by Christy Berry

Meijer by Christy Berry 48″ x 36″ Acrylic paint Indoor Light

This flower took years to create. It all started when I purchased a large canvas. I didn’t know what I was going to paint until I saw this group of flowers at Meijer. It was going to be a challenge to capture all of the colors and transitions. I started in May of 2016 and finished in April of 2017. Much thought went into the painting. I only painted on it when I was ready. I thought and thought about the flower. While I thought I created other paintings. I wanted it just right. I stared at it and thought about the colors.  I asked others what they thought. I added a few details and my signature.

I used two brands of paint for this painting: Liquitex basics and Grumbacher Academy acrylics. I used a variety of sized brushes. I started my base layer with a ½ inch brush and then transitioned to a 8 brush. I then moved to a size 4 and then a 2.  Finally, I added details with a 3/0 brush. While painting I generally listen to music with headphones.  I do this because I am generally painting when my children go to sleep. The music is upbeat and happy. I only painted when I was in a good mood and not exhausted. I wanted this one to be a colorful upbeat painting; similar to the flowers.

Meijer by Christy Berry

Meijer by Christy Berry 48″ x 36″ Acrylic paint Outdoor Light

When I took photos during the painting process the indoor lights from my studio area were florescent and incandescent.  I took two final photographs: one indoors with my studio lights and one outside with overcast morning light. There is a huge difference in how they look.  The outdoor light was bluer and changed how the painting looks. My personal preference is the warmer looking flower with the indoor light.

Please enjoy my short documentation video of my painting called Meijer.

Artfully,

Mrs. Berry

Personal Identity Portfolio

Front of Quality Folder

Personal Identity Portfolio by Christy Berry

 

I am continuing to set up my Cultural Art class.  The second week my students will be looking at what personal identity, family, and community mean to them.  The students will continue to use the 5E Model (Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend, & Evaluate).  I am also having students use the same format presented last week with the 4 boxes for Depth of Knowledge type questions.

I reworked this lesson from before. My original lesson was called: My Quality World.  My lesson was a good lesson and it was effective; however, it was not focused on the 5E model and that is what I’m working towards. It is a direction my school is headed.

So a short synapses of the lesson:

  • Engage: Students tell each other why an artist uses a portfolio
  • Explore: Students discuss the meaning of personal identity, family, and community
  • Explain: Students explain their neighbor’s response and to me the steps that they need to edit
  • Extend: Students answer the following question about their own artwork:  How do different characteristics in this artwork work together to express your personal identity?
  • Evaluate: Students use a rubric that looks like a hamburger in different stages of completeness, Students evaluate themselves along the way and I will also evaluate them throughout and then give a final grade when they are done.

My shameless plug: If you are interested in purchasing the lesson click here to be brought to my page on Teachers Pay Teachers.

Other websites to check out on Depth of Knowledge and the 5E model:

 

Artfully,

Mrs. Berry

 

 

What is Culture?

Bird HouseI am working on setting up my classes for the fall.  I took an online class this summer on using the 5E Model (Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend, & Evaluate).  I’m now incorporating this new knowledge into my lessons because it will help my students go deeper into the lessons and not sit on the surface of a really cool art project.

This is paired with my new knowledge of the term DOK (Depth of Knowledge). The art class naturally lends itself to higher levels of knowledge, because art is just cool like that.  My students cover DOK1 and DOK4 very well.  It is 2 and 3 that sometimes gets skipped over in the process of making art. There is a limited time in the classroom; however, these steps are important for students to understand why they are making the art and how to explain their thinking and what steps are needed for a project. In the long run, it will make them independent artists and problem solvers. So, it is a change in my mindset on how lessons should be run.

As I am setting up a brand new class I’m incorporating these ideas into my lessons.  My first lesson for my Culture Art class will be looking at: What is culture? This covers a Common Core Standard in Writing: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.6-8.2.d: Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

My students will be probably be confused because there is no making of artwork associated with this lesson; however, it sets up the premise of the whole class.  Sometimes middle school students don’t always have a sensitivity button installed and will say the first thing that comes to their mind. I’m installing the button at the beginning so that when we look at artwork from other cultures they have a common terminology and respect for others.

My three day lesson will have students bring in an object that represents their culture; it is a show and tell. Which by making it about them; I’ve just engaged the middle school brain.  It loves attention. I also get to know my students on another level. The following day students will use technology to explore culture topics and explain their results with others.

Finally, students discuss an extending question: “If you were to work at the United Nations (there are 193 different countries); why would understanding somebody else’s culture be important?

Throughout the lesson students self-evaluate on their level of participation. I will also evaluate them with my handy dandy clipboard and tally sheet.

My shameless plug (if you worked on a killer lesson for four days you would want to sell it too): If you are interested in purchasing the lesson click here to be brought to my page on Teachers Pay Teachers.

Other websites to check out on Depth of Knowledge and the 5E model:

Artfully,

Mrs. Berry

Forts & A Summer Read-A-Thon

As the summer reading program at the library comes to a close this weekend we needed a Read-a-thon for a final push to get us to our goal.  The “little guys” had a goal of 100 books and my eldest daughter needed 20. My goal was four books, because it was for the gas card; which we all made our goal.

group photosFor our read-a-thon the older girls (13-15 years) built a structure outside to house our reading event.  It took them about 45 minutes to build the structure for all of them to fit (4 teenage girls, three younger siblings).  We used four kits (Discovery Kids 72-piece build and play construction for set), sheets, laundry clips, pillows, and blankets. This made it very comfy.

I did not tell them how to put it together.  I was having them explore how to put the fort together.   My only requirement was it all needed to connect together (I only had a few sheets).

This was the outcome:

  • They worked together and compromised
  • They communicated
  • They shared
  • Problem solved when they ran out of pieces but still need the structure to stand
  • Helped each other out
  • Learned what worked and what didn’t (there were failures)

It is important in education to let students explore because, “One advantages of the exploration phase is that it provides students with a shared experience” (1).  The girls learned how to build a fort using the materials and they were excited when they were done.

Afterwards, they read in the fort all morning long (2 hours).  The benefits of having the girls spend a solid chunk of time reading were:

  • Having time to dive into a book and have no to limited interruptions
  • Getting to read whatever book you want
  • Promoting reading at their own pace and their level
  • Having natural discussions about their choice of books (not teacher directed)

Then of course there were the cookies and water that were provided.  This is a must for keeping teenage girls going.  There were also animals crackers involved.

After lunch (in the fort) the girls played Spot It and Go Fish. This was a fun way to finish up the afternoon before taking down the fort (15 minutes).

The girls really enjoyed the chance to build their fort and to read. They look forward to doing this again.  Please enjoy our video.

 

Artfully,

Mrs. Berry

1.    UTAustinX: UT.IITL.11.01x Classroom Strategies for Inquiry-Based Learning

Berry-Fantastic Art Making

Christy Berry

Strawberry by Christy Berry

There is an upcoming strawberry festival in the town next to us this weekend and we are excited to go.  Of course there are lots and lots of strawberries to purchase; it has been a very good year.  Our small berry patch has given us many tasty treats; however, not enough to freeze and make our pies.  We also go for all the arts, crafts, and entertainment.

So this past week I have had my eldest daughter and her friends, along with my middle daughter create strawberry paintings.  They were so focus you could hear a pin drop.  First time all week they were quite.  A couple of days ago we observed strawberries. One of the friends had never eaten a strawberry before.  I asked her mom and she said it was ok for her to try it. I didn’t want and food allergies to emerge all of a sudden. She took tiny bits and thought it was good.

All of them learned about runners and how to take pictures.  They then sketched out their ideas first and practiced.  Today they drew out their plans, applied sharpies and paint.  They also reflected on the processes.  They had a blast making their strawberry paintings.  My six year old was first to be done but she stayed focused for more than an hour; this was her second painting.

For anybody who would like purchase a copy of this lesson actually geared in a classroom setting click here.

Enjoy our Berry Art Video!

Artfully,

Mrs. Berry

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